/After a lawsuit filed by former service members, a judge in New York puts a halt to the licensing of cannabis businesses.

After a lawsuit filed by former service members, a judge in New York puts a halt to the licensing of cannabis businesses.

As a result of a lawsuit filed by veterans who assert that state officials have failed to follow social equity provisions in the state’s cannabis legalization law, a justice on the New York Supreme Court has temporarily halted the issuing of new retail cannabis licenses this week. The lawsuit was brought about by the legalization of cannabis in the state.

According to the Associated Press, a justice on the New York Supreme Court temporarily blocked state officials from issuing retail cannabis licenses on Monday as a result of a lawsuit filed by military veterans who claim that the state is not following the cannabis law’s social equity provisions. The lawsuit was brought by the veterans.

The order that was issued by Justice Kevin Bryant also forbids the Office of Cannabis Management (OCM) from processing applications for licenses to be used by adults.

The lawsuit filed by veterans alleges that the Office of Cannabis Management (OCM) designed a licensing system that violates the state law governing the consumption of cannabis by adults and improperly restricts initial licenses to people who have been convicted of cannabis offenses rather than a broader category of social equity applicants. The lawsuit asserts that the cannabis regulators exceeded their authority when they created the licensing category for people with convictions because that decision was not approved by the Legislature and because the decision violates the state constitution. Additionally, the lawsuit claims that the cannabis regulators overstepped their authority when they created the licensing category for people with convictions.

According to the law, people who come from communities that have been disproportionately affected by the enforcement of cannabis prohibition, ethnic minority groups, women-owned businesses, distressed farmers, and veterans with service-connected disabilities are all considered to be social equity applicants. The MRTA initially reserved a total of 150 CAURD licenses; however, the OCM approved an additional 212 CAURD licenses just one month ago, bringing the total number of CAURD licenses up to 463.

The office of the attorney general warned the court in a filing that stopping the program will be financially detrimental to retailers because these businesses have already spent money to set up shop under provisional licenses.

Friday will be the day that we present our oral arguments in this case.